Category 84: Aged Beer
Aged Beers are any range or color from very light to black. Aged Beers are any beer aged for over one year. A brewer may brew any type of beer of any strength and enhance its character with extended and creative aging conditions. Generally, but not exclusively, beers with high hopping rates, roast malt content, high alcohol content, and/or complex herbal, smoke or fruit content lend themselves to aging. Beers which are wood aged, or exhibit Brettanomyces characters or sour/acidic beers should be classified or entered into other categories if those options are available. Beers in this category may be aged in bottles or any type of food grade vessel. Aged character may manifest itself in mouthfeel, aroma and flavor. Often aged character is an expression of oxidative reactions that either bring individual extreme characters into harmony or are characters unique unto themselves. Sherry, fruity and hop transitions are common during aging. No matter what the effect, the overall balance should be balanced, harmonic and not extreme or distastefully aggressive. The level of changes created by aging will vary with different types of beer types. Lighter flavored beer types may often manifest aggressive and distasteful oxidation. Whereas higher elevations of hops, malt or alcohol can help create synergies with “good” oxidative change. Body is variable with style. To allow for accurate judging the brewer must provide additional information about the entry including the classic ale, lager or experimental style of the beer being aged, experimental or interesting techniques or ingredients, length of aging time, the material in which the beer was aged (glass, stainless, etc.), and other information describing the aging process. Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during judging.

Category 85: Out of Bounds Pale Ale
So many brewers like to put their on touches to traditional pale ales. Thus, these ales do not fit into the traditional pale ale style according to the definition from the Association of Brewers. The “Out of Bounds Pale Ale” category will let the judges use just their taste buds to determine which ale gets the gold.

Category 86: Out of Bounds IPA
Subcategory 86A: Non-Fruit – Out of Bounds IPA
So many brewers like to put their on touches to IPAs. Thus, these ales do not fit into the traditional india pale ale style according to the definition from the Association of Brewers. The “Out of Bounds IPA” category will let the judges use just their taste buds to determine which ale gets the gold.
Subcategory 86B: Fruit – Out of Bounds IPA
So many brewers like to add fruit to their IPAs. Thus, these ales do not fit into the traditional india pale ale style according to the definition from the Association of Brewers. The “Out of Bounds IPA” category will let the judges use just their taste buds to determine which ale gets the gold.

Category 87: Experimental Beer
An experimental beer is any beer (lager, ale or other) that is primarily grain–based and employs unusual techniques and/or ingredients. All entries in this subcategory must derive a minimum 51% of the fermentable carbohydrates from malted grains. Judges may consider the overall uniqueness of the process, ingredients used and creativity when evaluating beers entered in this category. Beers not easily matched to other existing categories in this competition would be appropriately entered into this category. For purposes of this competition, beers that are a combination of two or more hybrid and/or traditional categories (spice, fruit, smoke, specialty, porter, etc.) will also be appropriately entered into this category. Unless they represent a combination of two or more hybrid and/or traditional categories, most wood-and barrel-aged beers would probably be more appropriately entered in one of the many wood- and barrel-aged categories or subcategories shown below. To allow for accurate judging the brewer must identify the classic style(s), experimental style(s), process(es) and/or ingredients used to make the beer unique. Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during judging.

Category 88: Specialty Beer/Anything Goes
These beers are brewed using unusual fermentable sugars, grains and starches that contribute to alcohol content other than, or in addition to, malted barley. As nuts generally have some degree of fermentables, beers brewed with nuts would appropriately be entered in this category. The distinctive characters of these special ingredients should be evident either in the aroma, flavor or overall balance of the beer, but not necessarily in overpowering quantities. For example, maple syrup or potatoes would be considered unusual. Rice, corn, or wheat are not considered unusual. Spiced beers brewed using unusual fermentables should be entered in the experimental category. Fruit beers brewed with unusual fermentables should be entered in the fruit beer category. The brewer should explain the special ingredient(s) used and achieved character or nature of the beer, and/or the classic style on which the entry is based, to allow for accurate judging.

Category 89:  American-Belgo-Style Ale
A. Subcategory: Pale American-Belgo-Style Ale
Pale American-Belgo Ales are gold to light brown. Chill haze may be evident. Fruity-ester aroma is medium to high. Hop aroma is medium to very high, exhibiting American type hop aromas not usually found in traditional Belgian styles. Hop flavor is medium to very high. Hop bitterness is medium to very high. Fruity-ester flavor should be medium to high. Yeast derived characters such as banana, berry, apple, sometimes coriander spice-like and/or smoky-phenolic characters should be portrayed with balance of hops and malt character when fermented with Belgian yeasts. Diacetyl should be absent. Sulfur-like yeast character should be absent.
Brettanomyces character should be absent. Pale American-Belgo-Style Ales are either 1) nonBelgian beer types portraying the unique characters imparted by yeasts typically used in big fruity Belgian-style ales, or 2) defined Belgian-style beers portraying a unique character of American hops. These beers are unique beers unto themselves. To allow for accurate judging the brewer must provide information that identifies the classic beer style being elaborated upon (if there is one) or other information unique to the entry such as hop variety(ies) used, yeast type, etc.
Statistics:
IBUs: Varies with style
SRM: SRM 5-15
ABV: Varies with style
B. Subcategory: Dark American-Belgo-Style Ale
Dark American-Belgo Ales are brown to black. Chill haze may be evident. Fruity-ester aroma is medium to high. Hop aroma is medium to very high, exhibiting American type hop aromas not usually found in traditional Belgian styles. Perception of roasted malts or barley will be subtle to robust. Hop flavor is medium to very high. Hop bitterness is medium to very high. Fruity-ester flavor should be medium to high. Yeast derived characters such as banana, berry, apple, sometimes coriander spice-like and/or smoky-phenolic characters should be portrayed with balance of hops and malt character when fermented with Belgian yeasts. Diacetyl should be absent. Sulfur-like yeast character should be absent. Brettanomyces character should be absent. Dark American-Belgo-Style Ales are either 1) non-Belgian darker beer types portraying the unique characters imparted by yeasts typically used in big fruity Belgian-style ales, or 2) defined darker Belgian-style beers portraying a unique character of American hops. These beers are unique beers unto themselves. To allow for accurate judging the brewer must provide information that identifies the classic beer style being elaborated upon (if there is one) or other information unique to the entry such as hop variety(ies) used, yeast type, etc.
Statistics:
IBUs: Varies with style
SRM: SRM 16+th style

Category 90: Kellerbier or Zwickelbier
Subcategory A: Kellerbier: Pale Kellerbier
A very common seasonal summer beer brewed by many of the Munich area breweries and served in the beer gardens, where they are very popular.
Overall Impression: A young, fresh Helles, so while still a malty, fully-attenuated Pils malt showcase, the hop character (aroma, flavor and bitterness) is more pronounced, and the beer is cloudy, often with some level of diacetyl, and possibly has some green apple and/or other yeast-derived notes. As with the traditional Helles, the Keller version is still a beer intended to be drunk by the liter, so overall it should remain a light, refreshing, easy drinking golden lager.
Aroma: Moderately-low to moderately-high spicy, floral, or herbal hop aroma. Very low to moderate diacetyl, possible very low green apple or other yeast derived notes. Pleasantly grainysweet, clean malt aroma, with possible low background note of DMS.
Appearance: Slight haze to moderately cloudy, but never extremely cloudy or murky. Medium yellow to pale gold color. Creamy white head with good persistence. When served on cask, can have low carbonation and very low head.
Flavor: Moderately malty with a rounded, grainy-sweet profile. Low to moderately-high spicy, floral, or herbal hop flavor, with a moderate hop bitterness that can linger. Finish is crisp and dry, but the aftertaste remains malty. Very low to moderate diacetyl, which should always remain at a pleasant,
drinkable level that balances somewhat with the other characteristics of the beer; overwhelming diacetyl is not appropriate. Possible very low green apple or other yeast derived notes, and possible low background note of DMS.
Mouthfeel: Medium body. Low to medium carbonation.
Depending on the level of yeast in suspension, it may assist in creating a slightly creamy texture. A slight slickness on the tongue may be present from the diacetyl.
Statistics:
IBUs: 20 – 35
SRM: 3 –7
ABV: 4.7 – 5.4%

Category B: Kellerbier: Amber Kellerbier
Overall Impression: A young, unfiltered, and unpasteurized beer that is between a Helles and Märzen in color, spicier in the hops with greater attenuation. Interpretations range in color and balance, but remain in the drinkable 4.8% ABV neighborhood. Balance ranges from the dry, spicy and palecolored interpretations by St. Georgen and Löwenbräu of Buttenheim, to darker and maltier interpretations in the Fränkische Schweiz. This style is above all a method of producing simple drinkable beers for neighbors out of local ingredients to be served fresh. Balance with a focus on drinkability and digestibility is important.
Aroma: Moderate intensity of German malt, typically rich, bready, somewhat toasty, with light bread crust notes. Moderately-low to moderate spicy peppery hop aroma. Very low to low diacetyl, occasionally low to moderately-low sulfur and very low green apple or other yeast-derived notes. Caramel, biscuity, or roasted malt aroma is inappropriate. Appearance: Moderately cloudy to clear depending on age, but never extremely cloudy or murky. Gold to deep reddishamber color. Off-white, creamy head. When served on cask, can have low carbonation and very low head.
Flavor: Initial malt flavor may suggest sweetness, but finish is moderately dry to dry, and slightly bitter. Distinctive and complex maltiness often includes a bready-toasty aspect. Hop bitterness is moderate to moderately high, and spicy or herbal hop flavor is low to moderately high. Balance can be either on the malt or hop side, but the finish is not sweet. Noticeable caramel or roasted malt flavors are inappropriate. Very low to low diacetyl. Possible very low green apple or other yeastderived notes. Smooth, malty aftertaste.
Mouthfeel: Medium body, with a creamy texture and medium carbonation. Fully fermented, without a sweet or cloying
impression.
Vital Statistics:
IBUs: 25 – 40
SRM: 7 – 17
ABV: 4.8 – 5.4%

Category 91: Brett Beer
Aroma: Variable by base style. Young Brett-fermented beers will possess more fruity notes (e.g., tropical fruit, stone fruit, or citrus), but this is variable by the strain(s) of Brett used. For 100% Brett beers heavily hopped with American hop varieties, the fermentation-derived flavors are often difficult to tease from the hop aromatics. Older 100% Brett beers may start to develop a little funk (e.g., barnyard, wet hay, or slightly earthy or smoky notes), but this character should not dominate. If the beer is fermented with a brewer’s yeast in addition to Brett, some of the character of the primary yeast may remain. A faint sourness is acceptable but should not be a prominent character.

Appearance: Variable by base style. Clarity can be variable, and depends on the base style and ingredients used. Some haze is not necessarily a fault.

Flavor: Variable by base style. Brett character may range from minimal to aggressive. Can be quite fruity (e.g., tropical fruit, berry, stone fruit, citrus), or have some smoky, earthy, or barnyard character. Should not be unpleasantly funky, such as Band-Aid, fetid, nail polish remover, cheese, etc. Light sourness is acceptable with the beer being lightly tart, but should not be truly sour. Always fruitier when young, gaining more funk with age. May not be acetic or lactic. Malt flavors are often less pronounced than in the base style, leaving a beer most often dry and crisp due to high attenuation by the Brett.

Mouth Feel: Variable by base style. Generally a light body, lighter than what might be expected from the base style but an overly thin body is a fault. Generally moderate to high carbonation. Head retention is variable.

Overall Impression
Most often drier and fruitier than the base style suggests. Funky notes range from low to high, depending on the age of the beer and strain(s) of Brett used. Funkiness is generally restrained in younger 100% Brett examples, but tends to increase with age. May possess a light acidity, although this does not come from Brett.
Alcohol by Volume : Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU): Varies with style
Color SRM (EBC): Varies with style

Category 92: Session Beer
Any style of beer can be made lower in strength than described in the classic style guidelines. The goal should be to reach a balance between the style’s character and the lower alcohol content. Drinkability is a character in the overall balance of these beers. Beers in this category must not exceed 4.1% alcohol by weight (5.1% alcohol by volume). To allow for accurate judging the brewer must identify the base style by name or category number that is being created lower in alcohol and/or appropriately identify the style created (for example: half-alt, singlefest or baby bock). Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during judging.
Alcohol by Volume: 4.0-5.1%
Bitterness (IBU): 10-30
Color SRM (EBC): 2+ (4+ EBC)

Category 93: Session IPA
Should follow English and American IPA guildlines but should be under ABV: 5.1%.

Category 94: Gluten-Free Beer
A beer that is made from fermentable sugars, grains and converted carbohydrates. Ingredients do not contain gluten, in other words zero gluten (No barley, wheat, spelt, oats, rye, etc). May or may not contain malted grains that do not contain gluten. Brewers typically design and identify these beers along other style guidelines with regard to flavor, aroma and appearance profile. NOTE: These guidelines do not supersede any government regulations. Wine, mead, flavored malt beverages or beverages other than beer as defined by the TTB (U.S. Trade and Tax Bureau) are not considered “gluten-free beer” under these guidelines. To allow for accurate judging the brewer must identify the ingredients and fermentation type used to make the beer, and/or the classic beer style being elaborated upon (if there is one) with regard to flavor, aroma and appearance.
Alcohol by Volume : Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU): Varies with style
Color SRM (EBC): Varies with style

Category 95: Near Gluten Free
Gluten reduced beers’ original ingredients would have gluten content that has been reduced by enzymes or other processes to reduced

Category 96: Hard Root Beer
This category will be judged solely at the judges discretion.

Category 97: Peanut Butter/Nut Beers
Peanut Butter/Nut Beers are any beers using nuts/nut flavors(peanut, peanut butter, hazelnut almonds etc) as an adjunct in either the mash, kettle, primary or secondary fermentation, providing obvious (ranging from subtle to intense), yet harmonious, qualities. Clear or hazy beer is acceptable in appearance. To allow for accurate judging, the brewer should list what nuts are used, and may also list a classic style of base beer, or any other ingredients or processes used. Beer entries not accompanied by this information may be at a disadvantage during judging.