Home   |   Categories   |   Past Winners   |   Registration   |   CDN Registration   |   NHC Invitees   |   Contact Us

U.S. Open in the News
 
Follow
The U.S. Open
 
Facebook-Logo-Transparent.png (50×50) Twitter.jpg (50×50)
 
U.S. Open Artwork


BeerCLogoSmall.jpg (180×80)


 
 



Home > Hybrid & Barrel Aged Styles

Hybrid & Barrel Aged Styles


Category 53: American Cream Ale
A mild, pale, light-bodied ale, made using a warm fermentation (top or bottom) and cold lagering. Hop bitterness and flavor range from very low to low. Hop aroma is often absent. Sometimes referred to as cream ales, these beers are crisp and refreshing. Pale malt character predominates. Caramelized malt character should be absent. A fruity or estery aroma may be perceived. Diacetyl and chill haze should not be perceived. Sulfur character and/or sweet corn-like dimethylsulfide (DMS) should be extremely low or absent from this style of beer.
OG: 1.044-1.052
FG: 1.004-1.010
Alcohol by Volume:4.2-5.6%
IBU: 10-22
Color SRM: 2-5  

Category 54: American Wheat  
Subcategory: Light American Wheat
This beer can be made using either ale or lager yeast. It can be brewed with 30 to 75 percent malted wheat, and hop rates may be low to medium. A fruity-estery aroma and flavor are typical but at low levels; however, phenolic, clove-like characteristics should not be perceived. Color is usually clear golden to light amber, and the body should be light to medium in character. Diacetyl should not be perceived. Because this style is packaged and served without yeast, no yeast characters should be evident in mouthfeel, flavor, or aroma.
OG: 1.036-1.050
FG: 1.004-1.016
Alcohol by Volume: 3.8-5%
IBU: 10-35
Color SRM: 2-10 
 
 

Subcategory: Dark American Wheat
This beer can be made using either ale or lager yeast. It can be brewed with 30 to 75 percent malted wheat, and hop rates may be low to medium. A fruity-estery aroma and flavor are typical but at low levels; however, phenolic, clove-like characteristics should not be perceived. Color is dark amber to dark brown, and the body should be light to medium in character. Roasted malts are optionally evident in aroma and flavor with a low level of roast malt astringency acceptable when appropriately balanced with malt sweetness. Roast malts may be evident as a cocoa/chocolate or caramel character. Aromatic toffee-like, caramel, or biscuit-like characters may be part of the overall flavor/aroma profile. Diacetyl should not be perceived. Because this style is packaged and served without yeast, no yeast characters should be evident in mouthfeel, flavor, or aroma. Chill haze is also acceptable.

OG: 1.036-1.050
FG: 1.004-1.016
Alcohol by Volume: 3.8-5%
IBU: 10-25
Color SRM : 9-22 

    
Category 55: American Specialty Wheat
Subcategory: Light Hefeweizen
This beer can be made using either ale or lager yeast. It can be brewed with 30 to 75 percent malted wheat, and hop rates may be low to medium. Hop characters may be light to moderate in bitterness, flavor and aroma. Fruity-estery aroma and flavor are typical but at low levels; however, phenolic, clove-like characteristics should not be perceived. Color is usually straw to light amber, and the body should be light to medium in character. Diacetyl should not be perceived. Because this style is served with yeast the character should portray a full yeasty mouthfeel and appear hazy to very cloudy. Chill haze is also acceptable. Yeast flavor and aroma should be low to medium but not overpowering the balance and character of malt and hops. Brewer may indicate on the bottle whether the yeast should be intentionally roused or if they prefer that the entry be poured as quietly as possible.

OG: 1.036-1.056
FG: 1.006-1.018
Alcohol by Volume: 3.5-5.5%
IBU: 10-35
Color SRM: 4-10
    

Subcategory: Dark American Hefeweizen
This beer can be made using either ale or lager yeast. It can be brewed with 30 to 75 percent malted wheat, and hop rates may be low to medium. Fruity-estery aroma and flavor are typical but at low levels; however, phenolic, clove-like characteristics should not be perceived. Color is dark amber to dark brown, and the body should be light to medium in character. Roasted malts are optionally evident in aroma and flavor with a low level of roast malt astringency acceptable when appropriately balanced with malt sweetness. Roast malts may be evident as a cocoa/chocolate or caramel character. Aromatic toffee-like, caramel, or biscuit-like characters may be part of the overall flavor/aroma profile. Diacetyl should not be perceived. Because this style is intended to be served with yeast the character should portray a full yeasty mouthfeel and appear hazy to very cloudy. Chill haze is also acceptable. Yeast flavor and aroma should be low to medium but not overpowering the balance and character of malt and hops. Brewer may indicate on the bottle whether the yeast should be intentionally roused or if they prefer that the entry be poured as quietly as possible.

OG:: 1.036-1.050 
FG: 1.004-1.016
Alcohol by Volume: 3.8-5%
Bitterness (IBU): 10-25
Color SRM: 9-22 
   

Category  56:
Fruit Beer

Subcategory: Fruit  Beer
Fruit beers are any beers using fruit or fruit extracts as an adjunct in any of the mash, kettle, primary or secondary fermentation, providing obvious (ranging from subtle to intense), yet harmonious, fruit qualities. Fruit qualities should not be overpowered by hop character. Beers containing a fruit (such as juniper berry) with herbal or spice qualities would be more appropriately entered in the herb and spice beer category. Beers containing pumpkin would be more appropriately entered in the pumpkin beer subcategory below. Acidic bacterial fermentation characters may be evident (but not necessary); they would contribute to acidity and enhance fruity balance. Clear or hazy beer is acceptable in appearance. To allow for accurate judging, the brewer must list what fruit(s) are used, and may also list a classic style of base beer, or any other ingredients or processes used. Beer entries not accompanied by this information may be at a disadvantage during judging.
OG: 1.030-1.110
FG: 1.006-1.030
Alcohol by Volume: 2.5-12%
IBU: 5-70
Color SRM: 5-50 

 
 

Subcategory: Fruit Wheat Beer
Fruit wheat beers are any classic light wheat beers (see subcategories 2a and 3a above) using fruit or fruit extracts as an adjunct in either primary or secondary fermentation, providing obvious (ranging from subtle to intense), yet harmonious, fruit qualities. Fruit qualities should not be overpowered by hop character. Beers containing a fruit (such as juniper berry) with herbal or spice qualities would be more appropriately entered in the herb and spice beer category. Beers containing pumpkin would be more appropriately entered in the pumpkin beer subcategory below. Acidic bacterial (not wild yeast) fermentation characters may be evident (but not necessary); they would contribute to acidity and enhance fruity balance. Clear or hazy beer is acceptable in appearance. To allow for accurate judging, the brewer must list what fruits are used, may indicate whether the base wheat beer is to be served with or without yeast, and may list any other ingredients or processes used (for example, bacterial or Brettanomyces fermentation). Beer entries not accompanied by this information may be at a disadvantage during judging.

OG: 1.036-1.056
FG: 1.004-1.018
Alcohol by Volume: 3.8-5%
IBU: 10-35
Color SRM: 2-10
 

Category 57 : Vegetable Beer
Vegetable beers are any beers using vegetables as an adjunct in either the mash, kettle, primary or secondary fermentation, providing obvious (ranging from subtle to intense), yet harmonious, qualities. Vegetable qualities should not be overpowered by hop character. Beers containing a vegetable (such as chili peppers) with herbal or spice qualities would be more appropriately entered in the herb and spice beer category. Beers containing pumpkin would be more appropriately entered in the pumpkin beer subcategory below. Clear or hazy beer is acceptable in appearance. To allow for accurate judging, the brewer should list what vegetables are used, and may also list a classic style of base beer, or any other ingredients or processes used. Beer entries not accompanied by this information may be at a disadvantage during judging.

OG: 1.030-1.110
FG: 1.006-1.030 
Alcohol by Volume: 2.5-12%
IBU: 5-70
Color SRM: 5-50 
  
Subcategory: Pumpkin Beer
Pumpkin beers are any beers using pumpkins (Cucurbito pepo) as an adjunct in either mash, kettle, primary or secondary fermentation, providing obvious (ranging from subtle to intense), yet harmonious, qualities. Pumpkin qualities should not be overpowered by hop character. Entries in this subcategory may or may not be spiced or flavored with other ingredients. To allow for accurate judging, the brewer may list a classic style of base beer, and/or any other ingredients or processes used. Beer entries not accompanied by this information may be at a disadvantage during judging.

OG: 1.030-1.110
FG: 1.006-1.030
Alcohol by Volume: 2.5-12%
IBU: 5-70
Color SRM: 5-50

  
Category 58: Herb and Spice Beer
Herb and spice beers use herbs or spices (derived from roots, seeds, fruits, vegetable, flowers, etc.) other than or in addition to hops to create a distinct (ranging from subtle to intense) character, although individual characters of herbs and/or spices used may not always be identifiable. Underhopping often, but not always, allows the spice or herb to contribute to the flavor profile. Positive evaluations are significantly based on perceived balance of flavors. The brewer should list what herbs and/or spices are used, and may also list a classic style of base beer, to allow for accurate judging. Beer entries not accompanied by this information may be at a disadvantage during judging.

OG: 1.030-1.110
FG: 1.006-1.030
Alcohol by Volume: 2.5-12%
IBU: 5-70
Color SRM: 5-50
  
Category 59: Chocolate/Cocoa Beer
Chocolate beers use “dark” chocolate or cocoa in any of its forms other than or in addition to hops to create a distinct (ranging from subtle to intense) character. Underhopping allows chocolate to contribute to the flavor profile while not becoming excessively bitter. Beers made with white chocolate should not be entered into this category. The brewer should list the classic or experimental style of the base beer, to allow for accurate judging. Beer entries not accompanied by this information may be at a disadvantage during judging.

OG: 1.030-1.110
FG: 1.006-1.030
Alcohol by Volume: 2.5-12%
IBU: 15-40
Color SRM: 15-50 
  

Category 60: Coffee Flavored Beer
Coffee beers use coffee in any of its forms other than or in addition to hops to create a distinct (ranging from subtle to intense) character. Underhopping allows coffee to contribute to the flavor profile while not becoming excessively bitter. The brewer should list the classic or experimental style of the base beer, to allow for accurate judging. Beer entries not accompanied by this information may be at a disadvantage during judging.
OG: 1.030-1.110
FG: 1.006-1.030
Alcohol by Volume: 2.5-12%
IBU: 15-40
Color SRM: 15-50
 

61: Rye Beer / Roggen Beer
Subcategory: American Rye
This beer can be made using either ale or lager yeast. It should be brewed with at least 20 percent rye malt, and hop rates may be low to medium. A fruity-estery aroma and flavor are typical but at low levels; however, phenolic, clove-like characteristics should not be perceived. Paler versions of this style may be straw to amber in color, and the body should be light to medium in character. Diacetyl should not be perceived. Darker versions of this style will be dark amber to dark brown, and the body should be light to medium in character. Roasted malts are optionally evident in aroma and flavor with a low level of roast malt astringency acceptable when appropriately balanced with malt sweetness. Roast malts may be evident as a cocoa/chocolate or caramel character. Aromatic toffee-like, caramel, or biscuit-like characters may be part of the overall flavor/aroma profile. As in the paler versions, diacetyl should not be perceived. If entries in this category are packaged and served without yeast, no yeast characters should be evident in mouthfeel, flavor, or aroma. If entries are intended to be served with yeast, the character should portray a full yeasty mouthfeel and appear hazy to very cloudy. Yeast flavor and aroma should be low to medium but not overpowering the balance and character of rye and barley malt and hops. Brewer may indicate on the bottle whether the yeast should be intentionally roused or if they prefer that the entry be poured as quietly as possible. When entering, brewer may choose to indicate if the beer is a rye version of a classic style – for example, rye pale ale, rye porter, etc.
OG: 1.030-1.056
FG: 1.004-1.020
Alcohol by Volume: 3-5.5%
IBU: 10-35
Color SRM: 2-25

Subcategory: German Rye Ale
This beer can be made using phenol producing ale yeast. It should be brewed with at least 30 percent rye malt, and hop rates will be low. A banana-like fruity-estery aroma and flavor are typical but at low levels; phenolic, clove-like characteristics should also be perceived. Paler versions of this style are straw to dark amber, and the body should be light to medium in character. Diacetyl should not be perceived. Darker versions of this style will be dark amber to dark brown, and the body should be light to medium in character. Roasted malts are optionally evident in aroma and flavor with a low level of roast malt astringency acceptable when appropriately balanced with malt sweetness. Roast malts may be evident as a cocoa/chocolate or light caramel character. Aromatic toffee-like, caramel, or biscuit-like characters may be part of the overall flavor/aroma profile. As in the paler versions, diacetyl should not be perceived. If entries in this subcategory are packaged and served without yeast, no yeast characters should be evident in mouthfeel, flavor, or aroma. If entries are intended to be served with yeast, the character should portray a full yeasty mouthfeel and appear hazy to very cloudy. Yeast flavor and aroma should be low to medium but not overpowering the balance and character of rye and barley malt and hops. Brewer may indicate on the bottle whether the yeast should be intentionally roused or if they prefer that the entry be poured as quietly as possible.
OG: 1.047-1.056
FG: 1.008-1.016
Alcohol by Volume: 3.9-4.4%
IBU: 10-15
Color SRM: 4-12    

     
62. Smoke Beer
A. Subcategory: Bamberg–Style Rauchbier
These are various classic German styles made as smoked beers, including the lager styles Helles, Marzen, and Bock, and the ale Weizen/Weiss styles. Other German styles made as smoked beers would be appropriately entered in another subcategory shown below. Smoke character is not harshly phenolic, but rather very smooth,
almost rendering a perception of mild sweetness to this style of beer. Fruity esters, diacetyl, and chill haze should not be perceived in the Helles and Marzen lager versions of this style.

Bamberg-Style Helles Rauchbier should have beechwood smoky characters that range from detectable to prevalent in the aroma and flavor. Smoke character is not harshly phenolic, but rather very smooth, almost rendering a perception of mild sweetness to this style of beer. This is a medium-bodied, smoke and maltemphasized
beer with malt character often balanced with low levels of yeast-produced sulfur compounds or character. This beer should be perceived as having low bitterness. Certain renditions of this beer style approach a perceivable level of hop flavor (note: hop flavor does not imply hop bitterness) and character but it is
essentially balanced with malt character to retain its style identity. Helles Rauchbier malt character is reminiscent of freshly and very lightly toasted sweet malted barley. There should not be any caramel character. Color is light straw to golden. Noble-type hop flavor is low but may be perceptible. The aroma should strike a
balance between malt, hop, and smoke. Fruity esters, diacetyl, and chill haze should not be perceived.

Bamberg-Style Märzen Rauchbier should have beechwood smoky characters that range from detectable to prevalent in the aroma and flavor. Smoke character is neither harshly phenolic nor acrid, but rather very smooth, almost rendering a perception of mild sweetness to this style of beer. The beer is generally toasted malty sweet
and full-bodied with low to medium-low hop bitterness. Noble-type hop flavor is low but may be perceptible. The aroma should strike a balance between malt, hop, and smoke. Fruity esters, diacetyl, and chill haze should not be perceived.

Bamberg-style Bock Rauchbier should have beechwood smoky characters that range from detectable to prevalent in the aroma and flavor. Smoke character is not harshly phenolic, but rather very smooth, almost rendering a perception of mild sweetness to this style of beer. The Bock beer character should manifest itself as strong, malty, medium- to full-bodied with moderate hop bitterness that should increase proportionately with the starting gravity. Hop flavor should be low and hop aroma should be very low. Bocks can range in color from deep copper to dark brown. Fruity esters should be minimal. Diacetyl and chill haze should not be perceived.

Bamberg-style Weiss Rauchbier (Helles or Dunkel) should have smoky characters that range from detectable to prevalent in the aroma and flavor. Smoke character is not harshly phenolic, but rather very smooth, almost rendering a perception of mild sweetness to this style of beer. The aroma and flavor of a Weissbier with yeast is decidedly fruity and phenolic. The phenolic characteristics are often described as clove- or nutmeg-like and can be smoky or even vanilla-like. Banana-like esters are often present. These beers are made with at least 50 percent malted wheat, and hop rates are quite low. Hop flavor and aroma are absent. Weissbier is well attenuated and very highly carbonated and a medium- to full-bodied beer. The color is very pale to very dark amber. Darker (dunkel) styles should have a detectable degree of roast malt in the balance without being robust in overall character. Because yeast is present, the beer will have yeast flavor and a characteristically fuller mouthfeel and may be appropriately very cloudy. No diacetyl should be perceived.

To allow for accurate judging, the brewer must indicate which version of rauchbier is being entered – helles, marzen, bock or weizen. During registration brewers may specify pouring instructions, choosing normal pouring, quiet pouring, intentional rousing or not rousing yeast. Entries will be presented during judging as specified by entering brewer.
Original Gravity : varies with style
FG: varies with style
Alcohol by Volume: varies with style
Bitterness (IBU): varies with style
Color SRM (EBC): varies with style

B. Subcategory: Smoke Porter
Smoke porters are chestnut brown to black in color. They can exhibit a mild to assertive smoke character in balance with other beer characters. Black malt character can be perceived in some porters, while others may be absent of strong roast character. Roast barley character should be absent. Medium to full malt sweetness, caramel and chocolate are acceptable along with medium to medium-high hop bitterness. These beers are usually medium to full bodied. Fruity esters are acceptable. Hop flavor and aroma may vary from being negligible to medium in character. Smoke Imperial Porter or other versions that deviate from parameters below would be more appropriately entered in another subcategory below. To allow for accurate judging, the brewer must list the traditional style of porter as well as the wood type used as a smoke source. Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during judging.
OG: 1.040-1.050
FG: 1.006-1.014
Alcohol by Volume: 5.0-8.7%
Bitterness(IBU): 20-40
Color SRM: 20+

C. Subcategory: Other Smoke Beer
Any style of beer can be smoked; the goal is to reach a balance between the style's character and the smoky properties. Entries in this subcategory do not fit the other two subcategories of smoke beer. To allow for accurate judging, the brewer must list the traditional or experimental style of the base beer as well as the wood type used as a smoke source (e.g. “alder smoked dry stout”). Beer entries not accompanied by this
information will be at a disadvantage during judging.
OG: varies with style
FG: varies with style
Alcohol by Volume: varies with style
Bitterness(IBU): varies with style
Color SRM: varies with style

 

Category 63: Wood/Barrel Aged Pale Beer
A wood- or barrel-aged pale to amber beer is any lager, ale or hybrid beer, either a traditional style or a unique experimental beer that has been aged for a period of time in a wooden barrel or in contact with wood, that meets the criteria for color shown below. Entries are aged with the intention of imparting the particularly unique character of the wood and/or what has previously been in the barrel. New wood character is often characterized as a complex blend of vanillin and unique wood character. Used sherry, bourbon, scotch, port, wine and other barrels are often used, imparting complexity and uniqueness to beer. Ultimately a balance of flavor, aroma and mouthfeel are sought with the marriage of new beer with wood and/or barrel flavors. The brewer should explain the special nature of the beer to allow for accurate judging. Comments could include: type of wood used (new or old, oak or other wood type), type of barrel used (new, port/ whiskey/ wine/ sherry/ other), base beer style or achieved character. Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during judging.
Color SRM : 4-20
Alcohol by Volume: 3.75-6.25%

Category 64: Wood/Barrel Aged Dark Beer
Any classic style or unique experimental style of dark beer can be wood or barrel-aged for a period of time in a wooden barrel or in contact with wood. For purposes of this competition entries in this subcategory should have color greater than 20 SRM, but contain alcohol less than 6.25% a.b.v. This beer is aged with the intention of imparting the particularly unique character of the wood and/or what has previously been in the barrel. New wood character is often characterized as a complex blend of vanillin and unique wood character. Used sherry, bourbon, scotch, port, wine and other barrels are often used, imparting complexity and uniqueness to beer. Ultimately a balance of flavor, aroma and mouthfeel are sought with the marriage of new beer with wood and/or barrel flavors. Examples of wood-aged classic styles include but are not limited to Irish-style dry stout, robust porter, brown ale or other dark beer styles. Dark fruited or spiced beer would also be appropriately entered in this category. Sour wood-aged dark beers, and higher alcohol wood-aged versions of classic styles and higher alcohol beer styles with >6.25% a.b.v. (such as imperial stout, old ale or experimental styles for example) should be entered in other categories or subcategories shown below. The brewer should explain the special nature of the beer to allow for accurate judging. Comments could include: type of wood used (new or old, oak or other wood type), type of barrel used (new, port/ whiskey/ wine/ sherry/ other), base beer style or achieved character. Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during judging.

Category 65: Wood/Barrel Aged Strong Beer
Any strong classic style or unique, experimental style of beer can be wood or barrel-aged for a period of time in a wooden barrel or in contact with wood. For purposes of this competition entries in this category should contain greater than 6.25% a.b.v. They may have any range of color or other characteristics. Entries are aged with the intention of imparting the particularly unique character of the wood and/or what has previously been in the barrel. New wood character is often characterized as a complex blend of vanillin and unique wood character. Used sherry, bourbon, scotch, port, wine and other barrels are often used, imparting complexity and uniqueness to beer. Ultimately a balance of flavor, aroma and mouthfeel are sought with the marriage of new beer with wood and/or barrel flavors. Examples of wood-aged strong beer styles include but are not limited to imperial stout, double porter, triple pale ale or any other strong beer style that meets the criteria for alcohol content. Sour higher alcohol wood-aged beer (> 6.25% a.b.v.) of any color should be entered in the appropriate category shown below. The brewer should explain the special nature of the beer to allow for accurate judging. Comments could include: type of wood used (new or old, oak or other wood type), type of barrel used (new, port/ whiskey/ wine/ sherry/ other), base beer style or achieved character. Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during judging.

Category 66: Wood/Barrel-Aged Strong Stout
A wood/barrel-aged strong stout is any of the traditional stronger stout styles or unique experimental stout that has been aged for a period of time in a wooden barrel or in contact with wood that meets the criteria for alcoholic strength shown below. For purposes of this competition entries in this category should contain greater than 6.5% a.b.v. Wood/barrel-aged strong stouts will be characteristically dark. Entries are aged with the intention of imparting the particularly unique character of the wood and/or what has previously been in the barrel. New wood character is often characterized as a complex blend of vanillin and unique wood character but wood aged is not necessarily synonymous with imparting wood flavors. Used sherry, bourbon, scotch, port, wine and other barrels are often used, imparting complexity and uniqueness to beer. Ultimately a balance of flavor, aroma and mouthfeel are sought with the marriage of new beer with wood and/or barrel flavors. Primary character of the beer style may or may not be apparent. Examples of wood/barrel-aged strong stout styles include but are not limited to stronger versions of wood/barrel-aged foreign stout, British- or American-style Imperial stout, other strong stout styles, or other strong beer styles blended with stout that meet the criteria for alcohol content. To allow for accurate judging the brewer must provide additional information about entries in this category. Comments could include classic strong stout style and/or other styles blended with stout (if any) being aged in wood, type of wood used (new or old, oak or other wood type), previous liquids in the barrel if any (port/ whiskey/ wine/ sherry/other), or achieved character. Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during judging.
Original Gravity: Varies with style
Final Gravity (ºPlato): Varies with style
Alcohol by Volume : >6.5%
Bitterness (IBU): Varies with style
Color SRM (EBC): 40+ (80+ EBC)


Category 67: Wood/Barrel-Aged Sour Beer
A. Subcategory: Wood/Barrel-Aged Sour Beer
A wood/barrel-aged sour beer is any lager, ale or hybrid beer, either a traditional style or a unique experimental beer that has been aged for a period of time in a wooden barrel or in contact with wood and has developed a bacterial induced natural acidity. Entries are aged with the intention of imparting the particularly unique character micro flora present in the wood. Sometimes wood aging is intended to impart the particularly unique character of the wood and/or what has previously been in the barrel, but wood-aged is not necessarily synonymous with imparting wood flavors. Wood character can be characterized as a complex blend of vanillin and unique wood character. Wood-derived character can also be characterized by flavors of the product that was in the barrel during prior use. These wood-derived flavors, if present in this style, can be very low in character and barely perceived or evident or assertive as wood-derived flavors. Any degree of wood-derived flavors
should be in balance with other beer character. Usually bacterial and/or “wild” yeast fermentation contributes complex esters and results in a dry to very dry beer. Ultimately a balance of flavor, aroma and mouthfeel are sought with the marriage of acidity, complex esters and new beer with wood and/or barrel flavors. To allow for accurate judging the brewer must provide additional information about entries in this category. Comments could include classic or base beer style being aged in wood, type of wood used (new or old, oak or other wood type), type(s) of microbial contribution, previous liquids in the barrel if any (port/whiskey/wine/sherry/other) and achieved character. Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during judging.
Original Gravity : Varies with style
Final Gravity: Varies with style
Alcohol by Volume: Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU): Varies with style
Color SRM (EBC): Varies with style

B. Subcategory: Fruited Wood/Barrel-Aged Sour Beer
A fruited wood/barrel-aged sour beer is any fruited lager, ale or hybrid beer, either a traditional style or a unique experimental beer that has been aged for a period of time in a wooden barrel or in contact with wood and has developed a bacterial induced natural acidity. Entries are aged with the intention of imparting the particularly unique character micro flora present in the wood. Sometimes wood aging is intended to impart the particularly unique character of the wood and/or what has previously been in the barrel, but wood-aged is not necessarily synonymous with imparting wood flavors. Wood character can be characterized as a complex blend of vanillin and unique wood character. Wood-derived character can also be characterized by flavors of the product that was in the barrel during prior use. These wood-derived flavors, if present in this style, can be very low in character and barely perceived or evident or assertive as wood-derived flavors. Any degree of woodderived flavors should be in balance with other beer character. Usually bacterial and/or “wild” yeast fermentation contributes complex esters and results in a dry to very dry beer. Entries in this subcategory have fruit added at different stages up to and including during wood aging. Ultimately a balance of flavor, aroma and mouthfeel are sought with the marriage of acidity, complex esters and new beer with wood and/or barrel flavors and with fruit flavors and aroma. To allow for accurate judging the brewer must provide additional information about entries in this category. Comments could include classic or base beer style, type of wood used (new or old, oak or other wood type), type(s) of microbial contribution, previous liquids in the barrel if any (port/ whiskey/ wine/ sherry/other), fruit used, and achieved character. Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during judging.
Original Gravity : Varies with style
Final Gravity: Varies with style
Alcohol by Volume: Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU): Varies with style
Color SRM (EBC): Varies with style

 

 




Books to Help You Start Your Own Brewery
 
 
A Brewers Guide to Opening a Nano Brewery
 
Starting Your Own Brewery
 
Brewing Up a Business






©2008-2014 United States Open Beer Championship. All Rights Reserved.

Management Login

Powered By FlexCMS
Powered By FlexCMS


Web Development & Hosting Services by Webbed Otter